Thursday Tips (7)

Here is a collection of the Thursday Tips (and others) which have been sent to the OSA mailing list. Many of these can be found under the Techniques section as well.

2008: November, December
2009: 1st Page, 2nd Page
2010: 1st page, 2nd page, 3rd page, 4th page
2011: 1st page, 2nd page, 3rd page
2012:
1st page

howdy stampers,
have you seen all of the pretty vintage crinkle ribbon around lately? It is easy to make, all you need in 100% rayon seam binding, water and ink. Here’s how:

1. 1 trim off a yard or so of seam binding (white or natural is best because you can dye it whatever color you want) and spray it with clear water and scrunh it up in your hands.
2. spray it with color wash or glimmer mist (I make my own with liquid watercolors and water in a spray bottle) and keep scrunching in to blend the colors. add other colors if desired.
3. lay it in a heap to dry (outside on a hot day is good!)
4. enjoy your fab new ribbon!

I’ll attach a pic. I have a video of this process on my blog: http://thefrugalcrafter.wordpress.com/2010/09/02/surprise-its-a-boy/

Happy crafting,
Lindsay

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I think of all kinds of tips during the week but darned if I can remember them come Thursday but here is another one:

Make an image “pop” by highlighting part with a white pen after coloring. the white gel pens work really well over Copic markers or watercolors. It ads a nice sparkle to an otherwise flat image.

When you find a white pen you line make a not of what brand it is so you can by the same one again, I just got an inksentails from Ranger that is really nice, I think it came from one of our vendors here at OSA: Skybluepink I’m using that puppy all the time now! I’ve attached an example and it used the crinkle ribbon from the other tip!

Oh and 2 more tips!!!
If you look at the peony on the card you will see the white highlights, if you look at the stamped you will see my homemade flower soft. I did not invent this technique but it bears repeating: To make your own flowersoft take 2 styrofome balls (pack of 6 at the dollar store) and rub them together until they are gone. Separate the fluff into small zipper bags or jars and add a few drops of re-inker in each and shake. Voilà, homemade flower soft  for next to nothing!

When I was at the dollar store buying styrofoam balls I saw scented tubes of paint, there was opaque paint in squeese tubes that smelled like flowers, irridecent pant and glitter paint that smelled like candy and clear tinted gel glaze that smelled like fruit. You got 8 diffrent tubes for a buck. I used the opaque yellow flower scented paint as an adhesive for the faux flower soft. Pretty and smelly! Talk about a two-fer

Well, that’s all I can think of, I guess it is time to do the laundty;)
Happy crafting,
Lindsay

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It’s Thursday! I have a tip! I can’t believe it! I think it was last week that a lot of people were talking about glue. I hope this type of glue wasn’t mentioned. I just finished up my first altered book and it worked beautifully without wrinkles. On one set of pages I tried Aileen’s (which is a fabulous glue for lots of purposes) but it was too wet and my cardstock wrinkled like crazy. So here it is my tip for today:

For big pieces of paper to paper glueing, try YES! paste. It is a bit on the expensive side,$10 -12, but it is a huge tub and can be purchased at Michaels or Hobby lobby with a coupon.

Hugs,

No wrinkles in Michigan
aka Laurie H.

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Hi all,

I was trying to find something on OSA’s site and while unsuccessful I went to resources and looked through some of the info there.  One site that was offered was the Canon site. It has 180 printable chiyogami designs plus print and fold animals, oriental decoupage, Asian architecture and a really cool oriental dragon.  I went to the paper craft section (the dragon is under the lucky items) and the art section.  Here’s the link below.  I just want to thank the person responsible for providing this wonderful link.

http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/2004/list_15_1.html

Oops I just found myself muttering to myself that I’m going to go nuts with this site.  The possiblities for Christmas, birthday presents, me. I think I’m in trouble!

Cheers, Linda B.

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I was having trouble getting a new clear stamp off the acrylic, or plastic sheet it came on.  I found if I warmed up the back a bit in a corner with my hand, I could then raise the corner and huff & puff under the stamp.  Guess my hot air is good for something, as it came off easily without damaging the stamp!  lol

Hugs,
Pat

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Hello All,

Could not sleep, so zippin’my hot milk with honey and sending a tip.

Perhaps it has been sent before…but I can’t remember seeing it..so here goes:

Do you clean your stamps with babywipes and always using a large piece?

Here is my TIP…I cut them up in 2 or 4 pieces and safe them in a small Tupperware-box and this way  you have more babywipes for cleaning smaller stamps and it is easy to take them along to a workshop or just use it at home.

Groetjes / Greetings from the Netherlands
Carla

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Hi Everyone,

Finding an out of the way place to allow art to dry can be a challenge.  A repurposed ferous metal cookie sheet and refrigerator magnets create an inexpensive solution.  Check the cookie sheets in your kitchen with a magnet to see which one is ferrous metal.  Hang the cookie sheet on the wall of your studio and attach wet cards with magnets on the insides of the cards to avoid smearing the art.  Chances are you can use this tip without spending a cent.  Most of us have refrigerator magnets lurking in kitchen drawers that need a purpose.

Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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If you belong to AAA, or pass by a Travel agency, pick up their travel brochures to China (& other luxury tours). They contain some of the most colorful, scenic photos you can use in collage, cards, ATC’s. Maps, too. Can re-use and make envelopes from the glossy pages, also.  Best source for current China photos I found and it’s free!

Lynn L
Auburn Hills, MI

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Chances are, if you are a “hoarder” like I am, you have saved the foil that comes around potted plants from the florist – gold, silver, and many other colors. They are usually two sided in color. Cut into card size pieces, run through your Xyron machine, attach to card stock and then put through your Cuttlebug embossing folders – beautiful effects for your art at very little cost.

Barb W.

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How many of you like to layer paper on your cards? How many of you use beautiful and special papers for that unique effect?

Here’s a way to get more bang for your buck. Before you attach your layers, take your punches and punch out numerous shapes in the area of the panel that will be layered upon and covered up. Not only will you have these shapes to use as a matching accent you will gather a wonderful supply of shapes for many other uses. If you are really organized, use your die cutter to fully take advantage of that card stock. If you like lots of layers, it will also make a difference in weight/bulk when you go to mail your creations.

Susan Viley

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Hi All,

There have been so many wonderful tips that I didn’t want to give my little ones.  But, here they are:

1.  Before you give a card away or send a card to someone, be sure to take a picture of it so you can remember what you gave them when they talk about it later.  You will also have an example for another card in the future.

2.  If you take some embossing powder and mix an equal amount of glitter into it, you can make your image glitter like mad without the use of glue.

3.  Challenge yourself by taking your left over paper scraps out and making a card with it.

4.  If you don’t have very many word stamps, remember you can always change the font style on your computer and create words perfect for the card.  Print it out on card stock – white or colored.  It really personalizes the card.

5.  When you make a card that really speaks to you and says “Look at me!!  I am one absolutely perfect card!!”, take a moment and enjoy the praise of the moment.  You are allowed to pat yourself on the back for a job well done.

Sincerely,

Rli

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Not sure if this has been posted before…

If you use a stamp positioner this may be helpful.

When stamping any image, leave your stamp positioner in place until you lift off your stamp and check your image.  If the image is not as crisp or dark as you wanted or if there are areas of the image that didn’t stamp completely you can reink your stamp and stamp the image again without having to reposition your stamp positioner.

Hope that this makes sense and is helpful!

Laurel

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While trying to do a shaker card, I was having a terrible time with the micro beads flying all over and not staying where I needed them. I wiped the plastic with a dryer sheet and it stopped the static cling and the beads stayed right where they belonged. No more beads all over the plastic, card and table. I hope this will help someone else.

Bonnie Waliezer

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howdy folks,
I like to use my glue gun and heat gun every time I craft but I hate waiting for the glue gun to heat up. Also I hate worring if I left them plugged in. solution: Plug the hot glue gun, heat gun and a desk lamp into a power strip with an on off switch, make sure the light is set to on. When you go to your craft room flick on the power strip, you will now it is on cuz the light is on, your tools will be at the ready and when you are done you can shut them all off by the power strip. You might want to place a piece of tape over the lamps switch so you don’t forget to shut off the strip instead of the light.
All the best,
Lindsay

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Hi Everyone,

Storing unmounted stamps is always a challenge.  Having the ability to find images quickly, use them, and put the images away in a specific place helps save time for more creative endeavors.

Deciding whether to store images by manufacturer, in catagories as to type, in holiday assortments, and so on can be daunting and almost impossible to choose.  I found a way to store my ums so I know exactly where they are at all times.

The picture shows several hubless* VHS clear cases with a full sheet of images per case.  The outside plastic sleeve holds the entire index sheet of the plate so I can find the image to use and replace it in the hubless case when I am finished using the image.

For holidays, I have a hubless case for each holiday.  I write the names of the manufacturers on the backs of the ums so I can credit the vendor when I submit art for publication.

When multiple manufacturers are in one case, I stamp the image on a text weight sheet and write the name of the company beside the stamped image.

A 3-ring binder holds a second set of indice (stamped images) in categories so I go there first, find the image, note the number of the VHS case where the image resides, and I can go right to it.  Images that suit more than one category are stamped in each category that they fit.  For instance, a snow-covered tree can be used in December holiday art and in January’s winter art, so the image is stamped in both places.  This process eliminates having to choose one or the other place to put the image.

*Hubless: VHS cases for VHS tapes come with 2 hubs to anchor the tape.  HubLESS cases do not have the spikes to interfere with the ums’ storage, so I use the HUBLESS cases.

~~~~~
Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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Hi All,

This tip goes along with Laurels tip in a way.  Whether you use a stamp positioner or not, if you stamp an image and some of it doesn’t turn out, you can draw in the missing lines with a pen to match the ink.  If it still doesn’t match exactly, one thing you can do is go ahead and color in the image and make it like you would normally use it.  But then, place a sheet of the double sided tape (the one that comes in a single 8 1/2 x 11” sheet with the orange coating over it) over the image.  Stick it to your image piece of card stock, remove the orange piece so it’s sticky on the second side as well, and dip it in your clear embossing powder.  It gives it a whole new look and you can’t see the different colors where you drew in the lines.

I offered this tip a few years back because I used it to save a card I made using a stamp with a man in a boat fishing and the fish jumping out of the water.  The center of the stamp didn’t ink the paper so I had to draw it in (with a different color of black ink).

Rli

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Have you ever looked closely at the bags that vegetables & fruit come in, i.e. potatoes, onions, oranges, etc. Those great textured woven bags can become great texture backgrounds. Cut them into squares, lay them down & use the “ink sprays” to get a grid for your background. Let dry. Can use again & lay woven bag in a different direction & spray with a different color ink.  Or if using spackling paste, lay it into the paste, press & peel off carefully.

Lynn L
MI

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Since it’s just after midnight here, here are a couple of late tips.

Maybe shared before, maybe not, but worth another go round. These were shared in a workshop last week and I have seen several versions making the rounds online.

Paper too small to hold onto to punch? Attach a small sticky note and use it as a tab to hold onto the paper you want to punch.

Love spray mists? Ink a stamp in Versamark, spritz with your favorite color of shimmering spray mist and stamp. Beautiful especially for backgrounds on darker cardstock.

Get out those coffee filters, distress them, color them and then spray with shimmering spray mist. Punch out scallop circles and make beautiful scrunchy flowers or use for a great background.


Big Hugs,
Ruth

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Hi Everyone,

Iron-on inkjet transfer papers were originally designed for t-shirts and fabric craft projects.  Photos can be printed on the transfer papers using a standard inkjet printer and then ironed onto the fabric.  We have to remember to reverse the photo and text before printing or the picture will be backward.

The scraps of the transfer papers can be used with our stamping.  Scraps are usually small enough to fit on cards, yet large enough to fit small to medium sized stamps.  Use dye inks and permanent markers for colors and black.  Pigment inks can bleed, so if that is the effect you wish, use pigment inks.

Trim the stamped transfer paper or punch it out*, then iron the design onto your cardstock.  The effect will be muted since the image will be face down.  For depth, stamp onto the ironed transfer or color small sections to make your design pop.

*Nestabilities, Cuttle Bug die cuts, or any shape will also work.

Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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1. Store paper card stock scraps by color so it’s quick and easy to create a color combination for layering or collage.

2. Collect obects such as bottle caps, soda can tabs and other interesting thing you would normally throw away and use them for card embellishments.

Chris

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If you are having problems getting a clear stamp to stick on an acrylic block, you can clean the back side with a small amount of windex (window cleaner solution) and it will stick to the acrylic block like magic.

Rosemary L

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was wondering a hardware discount store the other day and saw an old calaloge stand, you remember the ones that stores used to have before the internet. It is like a podium with a big 3 ring attachment coming out of the center. I saw that and asked if it was for sale and they said take it! It is perfect for storing your UM or clear stamps in page protectors or stamp n store sheets. Just flip throught to find the stamp you want! I typicly use binders (I have about 15 chock a block full!) but this was a novel alternative, this stand only held 4 binders worth but it was still a cool idea:)

Lindsay

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Hi Stampers, this tip is good for your health!

If you get headaches when working on projects in your craft room you may not have good ventilation. Spraying, sanding and working with solvents add toxic particles to the air and in large quantities they can make you sick. You can inexpensively create an exhaust fan and filter to remove much of the junk from the air. Here’s how:

1. Get a box style fan, you can buy them for around $15 at Target.
2. Buy some filters from the home improvement store. You will want a courser filter if you can sanding (bigger particles) and a finer filter if you are spraying, airbrushing etc.
3. Turn on the fan and set it near your work area facing away from you (preferably towards a window, so it is blowing away from your workspace.
4. Place the filter (it is a large square and is just about the same size as the box fans) on the fan (the side facing your work area:intake side) and the suction will hold it in place. You can temporarily hinge it to the top of the fan so it doesn’t fall off when you shut off you fan.
5. Turn on the fan whenever you are working with potentially toxic materials, as a bonus if you (or hubby) is woodworking all of the fine sawdust particles will get caught in the filter and not in your lungs:)

Tips: Filters are measured in microns, buy a few different sizes, they are inexpensive and disposable. They cost more the finer the weave but think of all the money you save on an expensive filtration system.

Disclaimer: This DIY filter does not give you carte blanch to inhale toxic fumes all day. Use common sence, if you are feeling lightheqaded or sick while working with chemicals in your studio stop, go outside and drink a glass of water. Let’s be safe in the studio!

Have fun,
Lindsay

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I have a huge tip for any who are contemplating a move… Pack your own stamping studio!!

I only packed some of my stuff and am still digging out from the jumbled mess and totally nonsensical method that the movers used.

Laurel

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Hi all and going through my “stuff” and found some Fiskars Texture plates I had put away. Have two sets and if you have these, any papers which are wrinkled or maybe dampness got to them, get these plates out and work with them on these areas. Will cover them up and make some new papers for you to work with. Love all my stuff and hope this makes you love yours.

Marge in cool and rainy Bar Harbor, Maine

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Hi Stampers,
Last year at Target in the dollar section they had these great clear plastic dived 8.5″x11″ folders. I bought two because they were so great for storing stamped out images waiting to be colored, collage images and pattern paper scraps and all of the OFOs (unfinished objects) lying on around. I wished I got more. I was just at target and they have more in the dollar section! I stocked up! I like this because I can file coordinating papers, stamped images and embellishments in their own pockets, you can have 6 projects in their own pocket ready to go! you could use these to sort cardstocks by brand too. A great find. Also at Target they have white glue (20 cents a bottle), glue sticks (2 for 20cents), Crayola markers $1 a box (3 different kinds!), crayons 25 cents a box and rulers, scissors and pencils on the cheap. Think of how you can use these in your art or alter them or make “busy kits” for kids you know.

While we are saving money take a look at your storage needs. Office supply, craft and department stores have the clear plastic storage carts on sale and in good supply, I just picked up a 6 drawer Iris rolling cart at staples for $15 on sale and saw some great drawer towers at Big Lots for $20, think outside the box..or drawers so to speak and look at over the door shoe holders and other hanging closet storage options, You will find some great storage options for a song and as a bonus they come in really groovy colors now to appeal to the off to collage kids. Stores like Bed Bath and Beyond are having sales right now and often have 20% off or $5 off coupons in the mail, sometimes they let you use 2 different ones but ask before you checkout.

There is no excuse not to be organized…now if only I could get the rest of the house in order 🙂
Happy Crafting,
Lindsay

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Yesterday I spilled about 100 brads on my work table, which was a bigger mess than usual. I was picking them up 1 by 1 and realized I would be all day in that mess.

I got a magnet off the file cabinet and it worked like a, well, a magnet! I now have it in a drawer with my tools! I could not believe how quick it was!

Hugs,
Pat

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A tip not from me I found it on the internet.

Cleaning your cricutmat, in split secs as new.

First take off the waste. I do that with a ruler 30 cm wide .

Then take brake cleaner!! You spray it on the mat wait 2 secs and then remove with a filling knife( Dutch plamuurmes) the dirt. Really a big mat 24x 30 clean in 2 secs.

If the mat is really really very dirty may be you have to redo a small part. All the glue and dirt is gone,

You tape the sides of the mat with painters tape, spray with an adhesive and there you are you’re mat as new.

Poor provocraft they won’t be happy with me spreading this news lol. Brake cleaner only a few dollar and you can lots of mats for that prize.

If you need to make an inside cute on paper or stock. Use an awl and poke holes at each corner, then line up your ruler to the holes. Gently glide your blade from one hole to the other hole, as a trial run. You will feel if you are on course and know where to start and when to stop.
Carey

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Hope it’s not too late for this tip.

After a project, I am invariably left with lots of paper that is large enough to save for future projects but not large enough for a full card. In order to keep track of these pieces, I took an expandable multi-pocket file (similar to a check file or a coupon file), created labels with the names of the colors I use most frequently, then sort those pieces in there. When I’m in need of a piece in a specific color, I go to the file and look under the appropriate color tab. Being the obsessive compulsive individual that I am, I arranged the colors according to the spectrum, with separate tabs for light and dark variation (ie: light green, dark green, etc.) I even have a tab for metallics and another for specialty papers like glitter, etc. This works out very well when I want to try something out but don’t want to cut into a whole sheet of paper.

– Gitana, the Creative Diva

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Hi Everyone,

Stamps can sometimes come from the manufacturer with a protective silicone film. A quick wash with bar- or dish soap and a dedicated toothbrush will remove the silicone.

When bold images fail to stamp perfectly the first time you use them, note the areas that are not accepting inks well and erase those areas. Yes, use a child’s pink gum eraser or a pencil eraser and rough up the area to give the ink purchase.

Bold images stamp better when the cardstock is placed on a mouse pad. The extra ‘give’ of the foam pad adjusts to the image as it is stamped. However, some stubborn images need a hard surface. Experiment on newspaper and conserve your cardstock. Newspaper is paid for and will allow you to practice until you know how the image responds to inks and pressure.

Some images are so stubborn that they need to be sanded with fine grain sandpaper. Gently sand the areas that do not hold ink. Ink the image, stamp, and re-sand as needed.
~~~~~
Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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Bakers twine is the latest hot embellishment and is available in several colors. However it can be costly and not all of us need huge rolls of it. I stumbled upon an inexpensive but one color choice of it in you guessed it, the hardware dept. It’s called Mason’s Line and is a 250′ roll. It’s black and white and cost me $2.37 plus tax at Walmart. Same great cotton thread, same great design as bakers twine at a fraction of the cost. As oriental stamp artists most of us can easily use black and white in our creations.

A lot of items are priced higher when “art” or “creativity” is attached to them. We can find several of them a lot more inexpensive if we look around. A perfect example of high price is the Art Bin products which are made by Plano. The same company that supplies tackle boxes and tool organizers for a fraction of the cost. They may not be in designer colors but are cheaper for an identical item. So wander into your favorite hardware or home improvement shop and see what you can find for a “steal”.

Big Hugs,
Ruth

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This may not be a new tip for many seasoned stampers, but for those who have recently started it may be extremely useful!

CATALOG YOUR IMAGES!!!

I have 2 three ring binders…one for unmounteds and one for wood mounted images.

I have each binder divided into categories/themes and each stamp image gets stamped in it’s respective binder when I buy it.

Each stamped image has the manufacturer’s name and location (CD case number/tray/drawer) marked next to it.

Makes things so much easier when you’re trying to find a particular stamp image.

Hope this is helpful!

Laurel

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Hi Stampers,
Don’t you love it when you find a tool that works well, that you actually use and then find out it is great for something completely different?

A couple of years ago, when it was brand new, I bought the Stampin Around wheel guide from stampin up. It is two thick 12″ rulers that snap together to make a 24″ long guide or you can snap them together at a 90 degree angle to make stamped frames by masking with a post-it to get a nice mitered look at the corners. I love this tool and I use it EVERY time I get my wheel stamps out, no more crooked stamping.

But I found another use for this terrific tool, it make a great stamp positioner! Simply connect the two rulers in a 90 degree angle and place over your design, set a piece of clear plastic (like a transparency or square piece of product packaging) in the inside angle and line your stamp up in the corner and stamp. Place the stamped plastic over your design and line up where you want your image to be, place the guide up to the plastic, take away the plastic sheet (keeping the guide in place) and stamp strait down in the corner and the stamp will be where you want it. Simply wipe off the plastic sheet to use again next time.

The packaging that cuttlebug folders come in are great for this just be sure to trim off the lip of the package so you have a flat square piece.

My Crafty blog
I Design For
Lindsay’s Stamp Stuff

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I have so many birthdays and anniversaries each month so I make a list of the names, then on the left side of the paper the date of the event and on the right side the day it has to be mailed. I post this right above my stamping table. As I do them I run a red line through the name so I know it is done. Then I put them in the order of when they are to be mailed in a coil letter holder. I can check it each day to make sure they get out on time. Since the majority of the cards I make are a standard size, I also address the envelopes ahead and can just pick up the envelope to put the card in. Seems to save a lot of time and no one is forgotten.
Bonnie W.

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Hi stampers,
I found an awesome website that helps pick colors: http://www.colourlovers.com you can design color palettes or see color schemes designed by others. You can design patterns and color them or color patterns by others, it is a great way to get the creative juices flowing. You need to sign up to add content or save anything but it is quick. Have fun!
Lindsay

My Crafty blog
I Design For
Lindsay’s Stamp Stuff

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Hi All,
To add on to Laurel’s tip – not only catalog your stamps, but also put the price of them in your catalog and keep it in a safe place. If there ever were to be a fire (God forbid!!), your insurance adjuster just would not understand the replacement price of stamps and stamping supplies.

Sincerely,
Rli
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Hi All,

This is an old tip I probably mentioned years ago so decided to bring it up again for the “newbies”.

I had stamped an image on cardstock and the center didn’t stamp (I’m sure that’s happened to almost everyone here). I decided to pen in the lines that didn’t take. Unfortunately my ink pad was from one company (black) and the pen was from another (a different shade of black) and it was very visible to me. So, I finished coloring in the stamped image to see if it would still be visible – it was. Just shy of tossing it out, I decided to try something different that I had seen done on Christmas cards that gives it a frosted-glass look.

Now the image I stamped was a big stamp of a lake, boat, and fish jumping out of the water (you’ve probably seen that stamp at one time or another on a card). I bought a sheet of 8 1/2 x 11″ double-sided tape and cut a piece out to fit that piece of card stock. I removed the orange backing of the tape and placed it directly over my picture. I then removed the other side and dipped the whole thing in my clear glitter. It gave the picture a frosted look and you could NOT tell where one ink stopped and the other started.

In today’s world of needing to tighten our purse strings and supplies, this saves those pieces of stamped images that otherwise would be tossed.

And you all know that if you goof up on an image on the card stock – just flip the card stock over and stamp it again on the back side. This should work for all stamped images except those you are going to color in with alcohol inks like Copic markers. They will bring the ink on the other side forward into your image.

Sincerely,
Rli

Hi Everyone,

I am up and gone early tomorrow, so I am sending my tip this evening.

Have you ever used an item, set it down, and two minutes later needed to use the item again and it is ‘lost’ somewhere on your stamping table? Have you said, “But I just had it a second ago….” ? This tip might just do the trick to keep you from losing your mind looking for things you just had a minute ago. Read on.

A quick and easy trick to keeping things organized on your studio’s ephemera-laden surfaces is a shoe box or any other box large enough to accommodate the materials to create a single project. Place cardstock, embossing powder, scissors, punch(es), tape, glue, ephemera, and any other items including your rubber stamps and ink pads for the project in the box. Corraling the materials in the box keeps them from going missing as you work.

Each time you use an item and need to set it down, place it back into the box. When the project is completed, pick up the box and put away the items for next time. Trimmings can go into a folder, drawer, or file for reuse, repurposing, and recycling.

I have found that using this system keeps me organized, saves me time, and avoids that bewildered deer-in-the-headlights feeling when I
cannot find something I just had.

~~~~~
Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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Annette’s tip is what keeps me organized as well. When I am through with my project, say I have more materials left that I could recreate the same card several times, I then put that in a zippy bag, with a copy of the card along with the leftovers….then I can make more of that card, ATC, etc, etc…..I keep those in hanging files, in a file cabinet, for those days when I want to make something, but not start from scratch. I label them what type they are…..I call those my “quickie” cards. Since I have many avenues where my cards get bought, making many of one type is not a problem and is actually a great idea, saves me time too.

Lori A-O

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Background paper you can’t have enough and still it happens that you don’t have what you want.

Take a Photograph of something you like. The best is to make one of something you like but then a lot of items on it so it fills the complete Photo. For example the pond with lilies that I photographed this weekend. I could have taken the picture including the water. But no I just took only the water lilies to fill in the complete picture. Now I can print it out and use it as background paper. O just a strip of it on a side of a card.

The attachment is for you all you can print it out and you have water lilies to add to your cards.

If you google on parasols Thailand. You will finf lots of pictures of that and mosttimes a lot of them together on 1 picture, great background paper.

Groeten Happy Beppie

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I sent a tip yesterday, when someone asked how to make the best use of the beautiful designs of some of the embossing folders… so will repeat it today incase anyone didn’t see it.

Using Dry Embossing folders:

Use Vellum card stock to run through the folders. Vellum cardstock is much heavier than vellum paper and becomes more whitened where it is embossed.
There are even colored vellum cardstocks available… the design on it really shows up since pressing through the folder, the raised design is really whitened.

You can cut away part of the embossed design, and leave the rest.
You can also color from behind, giving it a totally different appearance.

This way you can really see the beautiful image, especially those Large images centered on the embossing folder.. like the Geisha Lady.

Using reg card stockion the folders with all over designs: use your stamp pad in “DTP” (direct to paper) over the surface of the embossed design to make it look like vintage tin tiles.
Cut pieces of the embossed card stock and use different colors, then use them in various places on your card… to give it added dimension.

Connie Smith, SR Supv SU DemonstratorGreetings

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OK.,I am one who is forever lifting and looking for things on my worktable.
I have one of Tim Holtz design rulers. I love it,but being clear plastic
it is hard to find when buried.
My solution-take an alcohol ink of your choice and give it a color.
Make sure the color you choose is easy to see through. Goes without
saying 🙂


http://deestamper.wordpress.com/ Blog

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In order to save time, I have attached an OSA DAK stamp on one side and an RAK on the opposite side (I use Aleene’s Tack It Over and Over on the back of the UMs) to an inexpensive clear mount. I leave it together next to my stamp pads. Whenever I want to send a DAKRAK, I have the stamp/clear block ready to use IMMEDIATELY to stamp on the envelope. Never have to look for the stamp. This is so much less frustrating!

Barb I

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Hi Everyone,

A great way to save money and use up what you already own is to find those discarded items wherever you put them for safekeeping. Take a look in your kitchen drawers, on garage shelves, in junque drawers, in the backs of cupboards, and in boxes storing stuff in dark dusty corners of your storage shed.

Look for old kitchen cabinet pulls that can be used for cigar boxpurse handles or used on the spines of altered books. Search out switch plates that can be used as frames (see the scan) when painted or covered with decorative paper. Old brass hinges from a discarded door are ideal to use as hinges on board books and treasure boxes or any other place you can think of and they will fit.

Rubber cabinet door bumpers work great as feet for cigar box purses, journals, altered books, as feet for stamped tile coasters to keep them from scratching surfaces, or for any other purpose you choose. The bumpers come in colors and shapes on plastic-coated paper and can be peeled off and applied without glue. Home improvement stores carry them.

If you have brass switch plates that have seen better days, use vinegar/lemon juice and salt to freshen the finish. Place the brass pieces in a bath of vinegar, add salt, allow to soak an hour, then wash in the dishwaster and be pleasantly surprised with the results.

For stubborn grime on repurposed cabinet door and drawer pulls, place the pulls in a saucepan, cover with water, add dish soap, and bring to a boil and simmer for 1-3 minutes. Test one of the pulls under cold water to see if it comes clean. If not, simmer the pulls another few minutes. Your cigar box purse will have a shiny ‘new’ handle that cost nothing.

Do poke around your home and see what you discover to use in your stamping. Anything you cannot use can be passed on or donated.

~~~
Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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I agree with Annette, we all need to help our planet as much as we can by reusing and repurposing as we can. Also it saves money and gives us more money for stamps!

I guess this is a tip? lol I bought a couple of Healthy Choice Cafe Steamers from the freezer section at my grocery store. A couple of nights ago I used the Sweet & Spicy Orange Zest Chicken. It was great, but the BEST part is I noticed the card board cover inside is a lovely Orange color with darker orange bamboo! WoooHooo! This is going to be used in my Cuttlebug to make a few great tags or some type die cuts for cards! What a find!
Hugs,

Pat

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Over here, (France!), it’s Summer time! There are flowers. leaves and bugs. Need a stamp for a nature project? Use the real McCoy. Take a leaf and press it gently onto a dye inkpad, place on project, cover with a sheet of paper towel/tissue and gently press. Your image will be delicate and life-like! The leaf may be used more than once dependant on it’s softness. Flowers and petals can also be printed, (it is actually the Japanese art of nature printing which I’m sure most of you know!), by using the same technique or using printers ink, (like acrylic), pigment pads or dye pads. Large leaves can be brayered with ink. and pressed. Special techniques allow the artist to print from fish, (please make sure they are dead and that you aren’t going to serve a multicoloured cooked fish to hubby on the pretence it’s a new species from the supermarket….), shells, and all manner of things. I keep to leaves, flowers and an ink pad…not adventurous! PLEASE DO NOT PRINT BUGS…they don’t like it… Experiment and have fun!

Darcy :O)

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Last weekend i was doing some heavy weight background cards.. I found I ran out of mounts for the rubber images that were 4.25 x 5.5 in size. I looked and looked but only had 3, which I was already using

Then I looked again and found the perfect mount—- So I spraying the stuckun on the back of the rubber slapped it on the heavy, thick plate from Cuttlebug (can use the thick one from Sizzix too) and stamped into it ( paper on top of stamp).

Came out perfect every time

Jann

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Hi All,

My tip is very simple. I keep going back to the mistakes I’ve made in the past. I love to go to Rubber Stamp Conventions and love to get the least expensive versions of the stamps. DH make the wood blocks for me but in giving them to him, they get all mixed up as to where I bought them so I have no idea what company they came from.

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Today I was searching out the “web” to find the company that made the stamp my daughter-in-law used on her card (I gave that stamp to her from the convention after I realized I already bought it a previous year). But, in my searching to find the maker of the stamp, I saw so many of my unmarked stamps on-line.

So, here’s my tip. Stamp your un-named stamps on a piece of typing paper and keep it close to your computer. The next time you are surfing the web to find stamps, you can check to see if any un-named stamps crop up. If they do, just write the company next to the stamp.

That will really help when you want to submit a card to a publisher but can’t because you don’t know who made the stamp.

Now, off to stamp my stamps on that typing paper so I can get some of them named.

Also, any Oriental writing that you don’t know what it means and the stamp doesn’t say – just take it to your local Chinese Restaurant (the next time you go out to eat there) and have them translate it for you. My Chinese Restaurant waitress is always excited to see me and see what I brought for her to translate.

Sincerely,

Rli

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I hope I am not too late for my tip which is :-

I use eucalyptus oil on my scissors to remove the goo, but I read the other day you can use the same eucalyptus oil to condition the rubber on your stamps, it said tp do it once a year.,

thats what I have been doing all afternoon

Mary xx

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Hi Everyone,

Scene stamping with gradations of colors for beach sand, mountains in the background, and the sky above are beautiful. Add texture to the sand with fine, medium and coarse sandpaper. Tear the edges to give a natural effect and layer the beach sand(paper) towards the front from the back (near the top to the bottom) to achieve depth in your art. Add more interest by dabbing a dedicated toothbrush in brown/tan reinker and flicking wee drops of ink onto the sandpaper. Wear gloves!

Australian beachs, at least the ones that I have seen, look like crystalized brown sugar. Delicious! The beachs in San Diego and along the California coast are a pale tan to light mocha in color. Around Big Sur (Clint Eastwood lives in the near at Malpaiso.) the sand is dotted with huge black rocks from suspected volcanic activity of yesteryear. Experiment and see what you can achieve with a bit of sandpaper. It really is fun.

Notes:
Use utility scissors to cut sandpaper or tear it. Sandpaper will dull scissor blades faster than a speeding bullet!

Sandpapers come in shades of browns and tans, but they also come in black and some colors if your local store carries colors. Home improvement stores sell single sheets and packets of 10-12. Try the dollar stores first in the automotive section.

Black or any earthtone tissue paper, wadded into different sizes, can be realistic rocks in a beach or mountain scene, in a backyard, beside a bridge or a lantern, or anywhere that suits your need. Consider adding a wee cricket or sea creature peeking out from under the rock.

For winter scenes, holidays, and new year art, use white Staz-On ink and your dedicated toothbrush. You can create a virtual snowstorm if you wish.

Happy stamping,
Annette “:O)

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I suspect I may be the only person that uses Prismacolor’s very often and did not know that instead of using Gamsol you can use baby oil. I recently found out from a blog I visited, and it works great! Also, even thought Gamsol is not supposed to have an odor, I think it does!

Just go lightly with it on a test paper until you get the feel of it.

Happy stamping,
Pat

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I like to dye ribbons to match my cards. So I buy the white ribbons and dye them with re-inkers or markers.
To dye them with re-inkers, I use plastic lids I have saved from various containers, or the little brad and eyelet containers. It works better dying ribbons if you have a top on the container so you can place the ribbon inside and shake it up.

If you use a marker, lay the ribbon on some waxed paper (or the backings from label paper) and just color the ribbon with the marker. This way, you don’t have to buy a ton of colored ribbons (unless you want to).


Connie Smith, SR Supv SU Demonstrator
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